01. To the Corbachian War Council: By Edward (Helkias) Hanscom

Telym Poleer

Inquisitor Third Tier

Corbachian Council member

 

To the council,

 

What follows acts as both my resignation and my Confession. For the better part of a year I have followed one, Helkias Gotholias Ryunn, better known to those addressed as “The Black Raven”. Contained within are the stories I have collected both by my own eyes and from those I have travelled with. Since before the fall of Corbach’s royal family I have been attached to Helkias to discern whether or not he would serve us. I made an oath to collect as much information as I could. And that I send you now. I hope that in reading my missives you will come to understand why I end my service to you and why you should never send another to take my place.

A Meeting

My first encounter with the Blackraven was orchestrated by the council, months prior to the coup. My mentor tasked me with becoming close to the man, to ascertain his usefulness to the council’s goals.

 

Helkias took his position as the Royal family’s Austringer more seriously than the name implied. Though he was chief amongst their hunters he was so much more to the family, especially the young princes. He oversaw their education, both scholarly and in war. He taught them the lost knowledge of Kantador, a god of light known in relatively few circles. The king held the Blackraven’s council higher than most of his advisors and many other men would have used it to sway politics and grasp for position. The Blackraven did none of those things, content with his place in the world and the lives of the princes.

 

I entered the tavern shortly after dusk. It’s position relative to the King’s Keep made it a popular haunt for those that served within, though it was mostly men-at-arms and low level attendants to the king, Helkias was known to frequent the establishment. I learned quickly that it was simply their choice of brown ale that drew the man there. It wasn’t difficult to find the man I was looking for. He sat alone in the far corner, holding a flagon in one hand and a book in the other. He seemed not at all distracted by the din created by the crowd or the cacophony that was the tavern-keepers choice of musical entertainment. He turned a page as I approached.

 

“Helkias,” I long ago learned to control the pitch of my voice, but looking at my quarry now I felt it waver, however briefly.”

 

“Aye, what is it girl?” he turned another page.

 

“I was told you were looking for an apprentice.”

 

He set down the book and took a long pull from the flagon. He flicked a scarred hand above his head and it was replaced without an exchange of words or coin.

 

“It’s true, the boy I trained to keep my arms and armor has become taken with a travelling minstrel and who am I to stand in the way of love,” he laughed at some jest I didn’t seem privy to, “It’s hard work and I can’t say I am kind to my equipment.”

 

“I learned from me pa how to handle flame and forge,” I lied.

 

“Ye can’t be more’n what twenty winters?”
“Twenty four,” I lied again.

 

“Come to the keep at dawn. Ye got papers I assume. Can read and write?”

 

“Well enough, mum saw to that.” I never knew my parents, but some lies pass easily enough.

 

“What’s your name, girl?”

 

“Telym. Telym Poleer,” A truth at last. None but my mentor knew my real name. No one else cared to learn it. It was meant as a protection. But this grain of truth held the web of lies I spun together with a single strand of honesty.

 

“Well Telym, til the morrow,” He picked up his book where he left off.

 

I spent three months slowly ingratiating myself with the man. I learned a great deal about his time before his appointment. His family in the hills. His father the priest. The loss of his faith and so the power he was supposed to carry. None of it presented an opening to twist and pull and make him the council’s man. Still I listened and I learned. The way he treated the young princes was unheard of. They were not pampered and princely when they came to his yard. Hours spent being pummeled with wooden sword and shield. Learning when to deflect and when to evade. When to advance or retreat. The lessons learned there may have shone through later in life, if they had the chance. Helkias did not discriminate either, he actively cared about those who came through his yard and be it prince, servant, or blacksmith’s daughter he would train them. So it was that my years of training with the blade was augmented by the man I was betraying on a weekly basis.

 

My mentor sent no word when the time came. And I only heard about the flight of the Blackraven. The royal family butchered and under Helkias’ care. I knew it would break him. Knew he would lose all purpose.

 

I was wrong. I was so very wrong.

 

The council sent me to catch up with the refugees to ensure they chose exile and not open rebellion. So it was that I passed through the broken lot of them. And there he stood, alongside a barbarian from the North. Armor burnt black. Spear and shield sundered. But as the two of them spoke others joined them. And it wasn’t anguish or horror that I saw spread across his face. It was something that I only saw three times in my months of knowing him. Once that first night when I watched from the shadows and he turned a page. Once when young prince Eric defeated three older boys in a particularly nasty bit of combat. And once when I told him the lie of my home, my mother and father how I imagined them. Unevenly he smiled and slapped the barbarian on the back. It seemed they’d decided something of import. He turned and looked over the refugees and locked eyes with me. We exchanged a nod. It wasn’t until later that I’d learned he knew who I was from the moment I entered the tavern.

 

It wasn’t until later I learned why he accepted my betrayal.

 

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Legends of Voraniss: Sariandi the Sly

If Mon’ghora was the Queen of the Forest, Sariandi would have been her advisor. The vixen always had the Queen’s confidence, and was found at her side sharing in her secrets even before the start of the War of the Giants; but when Mon’ghora was flung far up into the sky things began to fall apart. The animals of the land found themselves without strong leadership in the face of a new wave of Giant aggression. They were hunted for pelts that the Giants would drape about their shoulders like morbid fashion statements or used for rugs in the cold, stony, and damp caverns that most of the Giants called home.

In a panic, the animals scattered. They had no desire to be the next to fall and their will to fight was decimated when they saw their loved ones being used as trophies. How cruel the world was when fear was so great that the fires of vengeance had been completely smothered by it.

Sariandi knew that if something didn’t change, and soon, the Giants would win this fight and forever change the face of this great land. Unlike the others, her passion for victory had not entirely faded. She kept Mon’ghora’s face in the forefront of her mind, remembering the love the two friends had shared. She clung to those memories and used them to keep herself going. She ran with the others, all the while plotting and scheming her next move.

One day the animals had a terribly close call. A small group of them had stopped by the lake to drink, swim, and refresh their weary bodies when they heard the rumbling of nearby Giant feet. One Giant was enough to tip them off to the danger, but there was definitely more than one. All around them the startled animals could feel the ground shake. Even the trees were trembling, losing their leaves against their will as the Giants intruded upon the quiet paradise.

“Run!” they cried. “The Giants are coming!” And run they did, though many were lost as the Giants seized up the limbs of trees and batted at the slowest animals in the back; clubbing them over the head to stun and grab them up. The whole earth shook as they pursued the fearful creatures. When they laughed, it surfaced as a cruel and odorous wind that the animals thought they could never unhear.

“Get the beasts! Get them! Let their hides be trophies for King Velindahl!” One Giant shrieked above the others.

King Velindahl was the leader of the Giants, and Sariandi was not impressed by him. He boldly claimed to be descended from the earth itself, and was often depicted sitting upon a throne of gold and rare gems that had been expertly handled to make each facet shine as bright as a star. Mon’ghora had always said he was a braggart, thinking that the advanced smithing techniques of the Giants put them far above the other creatures living in this land. It was that same sense of superiority that had started this war, Sariandi believed. King Velindahl had always been jealous of Mon’ghora’s popularity and status and so it only made sense that his Giants lashed out at her because of his ego. If only there was some way to use it against him…

Sariandi continued to run, fleeing for her life as the Giants began to gain on them. It wasn’t looking good. Their long strides gave them an unavoidable advantage, and their advance wasn’t going to be stopped by brute force; not without organized resistance anyway. The vixen grit her teeth, feeling the pounding vibrations of their pursuers beneath her paws when she was struck with an idea. She paused, suddenly, urging the others to continue.

“Go, run! Save yourselves! I have a plan!” she cried.

“No Sariandi! You can’t!” the animals pleaded, “They’ll kill you!”

“Do as you’re told,” she growled back in frustration. “I will be fine knowing that you made it to safety.” This uttered, the vixen turned and started to run back towards the Giants. Everyone stared in shock, surprised by the sudden audacity of this little fox. Sariandi wasn’t a brawler like Mon’ghora had been. Nor was she huge. She may have even been runty by fox standards, with tiny black paws and a crooked fluffy tail, but at least she was quick. She ran as fast as she could, trying to get the attention of her enemies. “Hey! You there! Let my people go and you’ll be rewarded!”

The Giants looked up in surprise upon being addressed. “Are you talking to us? What do you have that could possibly appease us beside the fur upon your skin and the meat upon your bones?” they teased.

Sariandi was careful to not stop running. If the Giants caught her before her bait had been delivered, then this entire maneuver would have been for naught. “I have information for King Velindahl. Information about the location of Mon’ghora’s secret treasure.”

“Secret treasure?” One of the Giant’s scratched his chin, unsure if the fox could be believed. “Why don’t you just tell us? We can bring it back for him.”

“I tell King Velindahl, or I tell no one. Your King wouldn’t like it if he found out that you had lost this information for him…would he? I hear he has quite the temperament,” Sariandi said coyly. She knew she had them now. Velindahl was notorious for his barbarous attitude towards those that had failed him. His own reputation would be his undoing.

“Well, no. Of course he wouldn’t like that,” the biggest of the Giants said. “Fine. We’ll stop chasing your friends for now, but you have to come with us and tell the King your secrets. If you don’t, we’ll crush your skull and use the splinters of your bones for toothpicks. Do you understand?”

“I understand,” said Sariandi, and she cautiously ventured forward into the waiting palm of her enemy. “I am with you.”

The Giants marched back in the direction of the mountains and took Sariandi with them. At their pace they were able to travel distances that might have taken Sariandi days by herself. Despite her anger with the Giants, she was still impressed by this and marveled at the speed with which they traversed the countryside. They were eager to get home and make their King happy, thinking they were bringing him the greatest gift he had ever received.

When they arrived at the entrance to King Velindahl’s cave, Sariandi realized that it was far more than some dark hole. This was a mountain stronghold built directly into the stone and disguised as a natural feature of the land so that its true entrance might not be so easily discerned by outsiders. Their stone craft was so impressive that for a brief instant, Sariandi lamented that the Giants were her adversaries. What they could have learned from each other if only their existence hadn’t been plagued by war and competition.

She was brought before King Velindahl and set upon a stone pedestal so that she was higher off the floor than she would have liked to be. The King wasn’t keen on bending over to listen, the Giants explained when she looked confused. Sariandi tilted her head as she regarded King Velindahl up close for the first time. The throne of gold hadn’t been a myth after all, but it was Velindahl himself that really caught her undivided attention. His skin was like marble; stone painted with darkened veins that curled around his arms and down his body. His long hair sparkled like a waterfall of crystallized quartz, and his beard was equally extravagant. He must have been a sight to behold in the daylight, casting small rainbows all about him.

He sat tall upon his throne for the moment, refusing to bend down and make eye contact. “What is this?” he asked, motioning to Sariandi on the pedestal before him. “You bring me a live one? What use have I for such? Kill it and be done with the deed.”

“My King, please. This one claims that it has information for you regarding the whereabouts of Mon’ghora’s treasures. It wouldn’t tell any but you,” one of the Giants explained.

“Mon’ghora’s treasures?” King Velindahl lifted one of his brows, trying not to give away just how excited he was by the prospect. He inched forward and finally looked at Sariandi as though seeing her for the first time. “Is this true, beast? Do you have this information?”

“I do, great King. May I just say what a pleasure it is to finally make your acquaintance? I had heard stories of your majesty, but I am humbled seeing it in person for the first time,” Sariandi said with a smile. The best lies always came with a kernel of truth.

“Is that so?” The Giant King bristled with a bit of pride at the flattery. “Well now, most of your kind don’t share your keen senses.” He chuckled to himself, slowly blinking his large eyes. “How do you know Mon’ghora? What was your relationship?”

“I was one of her servants, your majesty. I helped take care of her family, and often aided her with family matters,” Sariandi replied. This too was not entirely a lie. As a friend and confidant, Sariandi had seen more of Mon’ghora’s personal life than most were privy to.

“Mmm-hmm,” the Giant mused, pinching his chin between his thumb and pointer finger. It was a boring relationship, so he had no reason to question its validity. “What do you want in exchange for this information? I assume you want something. Most do.”

Sariandi looked up at the Giant and tilted her head in the other direction. “I am not sure how much I can trust that my wishes will be granted. How am I to know that you or your kin will not just kill me when I have divulged my valuable secrets?”

Velindahl slammed a fist against his chest before pushing a hand back through his hair. “A good King always keeps his word.”

“Would you swear upon a standing stone?” Sariandi pressed. She knew that most folk were highly superstitious about the mysterious rocks, none more so than the Giants.

“I would,” Velindahl said sternly.

Sariandi nodded and bowed her head. “I should have known that the King of the Giants would be so generous and virtuous,” she said in praise, “not to mention strong.”

“It is often the strong that are in the position to offer mercy,” he bragged. “Come now. Tell me what you seek in exchange for Mon’ghora’s treasure.”

Sariandi paused a few moments to make it seem like she was deep in thought and carefully considering her desires. When at length she spoke again, she had one simple request. “I wish to see a demonstration of your strength, mighty King. How deep a hole could you punch into the ground in one go? I’m guessing at least a mile by the size of your arms. You’re probably even a better digger than me.”

“Child’s play,” the King scoffed, “But my word is my word and I will keep it.” He rose from his throne and plucked up Sariandi in his hand as he strode outside, placing her down when he came to a wide, flat place that he found suitable to her challenge. “Steady yourself, little beast,” he cautioned. He pulled his arm back and bent his elbow so that it stood above his head.  With a powerful yell, he drove his fist forward into the ground and shattered the rock beneath him. The earth moaned in pain as the wounds ran deep, but King Velindahl was laughing too hard to hear it. “See? The stories of my greatness rival the might of the Primals themselves!”

“Is that so? Wow! I’ve never met anyone as great as you,” Sariandi kept goading him on. “I bet you could beat one of those in a fight too, huh?”

“Of course I could!” Velindahl kept laughing, snorting air in through his nose. “No Primal could withstand the might of my fist! I can break mountains and shatter diamonds with my fingers!”

But Sariandi wasn’t the only one that heard the claim. Deep beneath the ground there stirred a force so ancient that it was there when the world was made. An Earth Primal had awoken, and it was not pleased with the wound it had already sustained from this Giant, nor the ensuing taunts and challenges.

All around Sariandi and the Giants the mountains began to groan and crack, shifting into earthen appendages. The world shook as it came alive, and those angry hands lashed out as a man might lash out at a bug. The mitts of stone pushed together and squished everything into their palms, destroying King Velindahl, his palace, his minions, and Sariandi all in one fell swoop. Where there was once a vibrant civilization of Giants and their skilled craftsmen, now there was only a stone tomb; and a mountain carved from their corpses.

The few Giants that did manage to survive that day surrendered to the Animal-kin and retreated into the mountains never to be seen again; humbled by the true power of nature. Sariandi’s people began to worship her as a hero after her death, learning of her deeds from the Giants that loathed her for this trickery and manipulation. All that was left of Giant-kind after that were bits and traces of their peoples; lost artifacts and swirling runes that can be found all over Voraniss to this day.

Elowen’s Story: By Gisella (Elowen) Aguirre

I can hear yelling in the distance. The smell of fire fills the air. In a haze, I sit up in my bed just as my father bursts through the door. He yells at me to wake my mother and sister and grab some provisions. I look behind him to the opening of the door to what seems like an all out massacre. I quickly dress and go to where my sister and mother were sleeping. My father grabs his bow and tells me goodbye. Confused at first, I understand what he means for us to do. I argue with him and tell him I want to help but he tells me that our safety is more important. I oblige. My mother, sister, and I sneak our way through the village as we see friends strewn about, slaughtered. Men, women, children, no one is spared. As we make our way to the forest, I look back and see my father fighting valiantly, he notices me and nods to me. I see a figure approach him, I have to stifle a scream as the sword goes through my fathers chest. I wake up covered in sweat. It had been a while since I dreamt about that night. 84 years to the date.

I was born in the mid-winter of the year 192 in a village a few miles south east of Corbach. My home was called Endora. We were a peaceful village deep in the woods. We were known for our hunting skills and our Lavender Mead. My father, Rowan, was the leader of our village hunting group. My mother, Illania, was one of the village’s seamstress’. Our family’s symbol was the stag, which was very fitting as our surname is Feenat, which means deer. In the spring of 214, my sister Lyhra was born. She was more like my mother and helped with sewing and cooking, while I looked up to my father more. To my mother’s objections, we would sneak off in the early morning and he would teach me how to hunt and the way of the sword. On my 100th birthday, my parents presented me with a necklace in the shape of a stag, made by my father. My mother gifted me a beautiful dress, and Lyhra gave me a sundial compass. Things were quiet, peaceful, and happy until the night of autumn 933.

I was able to get my mother and sister out safely and ran into some of the other villagers as well. It seemed there were not many of us that managed to escape. We kept walking while the fires of Endora lit the sky. I have no idea how long we walked till we found a place safe enough to rest. I, along with two other women took shifts keeping watch while the others managed to sleep. I prayed to our god Rillifane Rallathil for protection of our people, and fell asleep. The sun piercing through the trees is what woke me up. We managed to find berries and went hunting for food, thanking Solonor Thelandira, our god of the hunt, when I caught a wild boar and some wild rabbits. After everyone was fed, we preceded to venture forth deeper into the woods. We came upon an area that was well hidden and decided to set up there. We managed to live there for a good seventeen years, then decided to keep moving. We became nomads and lived within the woods for the next sixty seven years.

This morning, after waking up from that nightmare, I went out exploring for our next location and noticed smoke in the distance. My curiosity got the better of me and I found myself making my way towards it. As I neared the source, I could hear fighting. I made my way up into the trees to get a better view and assess the situation. A pair of goblins were attacking a caravan. There was a tall burly man, a dwarf, and a magician alongside 3 other men fighting the creatures. I inched my way closer to them and snapped one of the branches, which caught the attention of one of the goblins. As it began charging towards me, and I jumped out of the tree sword in hand. I defeated the goblin with little difficulty, keeping to my fathers discipline and immediately ran to the aid of the rest of the group. Together we are able to defeat all of the goblins. The tall man introduced himself as Cronin the Barbarian, who seems to be the leader, the dwarf is named Helkias the Blackraven,  the magician is Ruthade, and the other two are named Critta and Quatra. Odd names for an odd bunch. They told me they are on their way to Rhiassa and Cronin invites me to come along. He claims he is in need of more swords. I tell them that I am grateful for the invitation and that I just need to gather some personal belongings and then I promptly returned to my mother and sister. I made it back to our hideout and when I told them about my encounter I could see my mother get upset. She argues that I should stay out of the outsider’s troubles and it would be better if I stayed with her, safe and secure. I tell her that our people need protection and that regardless of her thoughts, I would be going. She walks away from me as I try to say farewell. My sister, with a sad look in her eyes, agrees with my point. She hugs me goodbye and hands me a satchel full of provisions as I tell her to take care of mother and head back to the men. Corellion give me strength I pray as I wave to the men upon my return.

Experimental Flat-Foam Weapon Making Guide: by Renee & Derek Booke (Kindrianna & Hygar)

With the Voraniss forges up and running we’ve been able to produce some really neat LARPing weapons as of late. Sure they lack the beauty of latex that a portion of the Realms community desires, but they do look more realistic than our traditional rounded boffers. We’ve had a lot of inquiries about our process, and even requests for commissions, so we thought we’d bring the info directly to you do it yourselfer types in the hopes that maybe a compromise can be struck in our community as we continue to create and innovate.

For this project you will need the following: Blue camp foam, driveway makers, sandpaper, Dap contact cement, super glue, Gorilla Glue, duct tape, and strapping tape. For tools, you will need a sharp knife (an X-acto knife will suffice for this), a saw, measuring tape and some scissors. Pretty much all of these materials can be found at your local Walmart. The driveway markers are also available at Home Depot and Lowes if you’d prefer to shop there. Once you’ve got everything you need you’ll be ready to start!

 

Step One: Cutting the “Pipe”

For these weapons we’ve been using the fiberglass driveway markers for cores. They aren’t too expensive, and they are readily available at multiple locations as mentioned above. To begin your project you need to decide what length weapon you are going to create, and what type. This matters because you’re going to need to leave room for a thrusting tip; and how much room you need to leave varies on the type of weapon you’re creating. From our experience, if you’re making a hammer, axe, or mace you’ll want to cut your core pipe two inches shorter than your desired length. So if you’re making a 3’8”, your core will be cut at 3’6”. On the other hand, if you want to make a sword or a blade, you should cut the core four inches shorter than your desired length. In the example of a 3’8”, you’d be cutting your core at the 3’4” mark.

Use the saw to cut the core once you’ve decided what you’re making, and use your free hand to keep it steady. The last thing you want is to saw crooked or cut one of your fingers.

While you’re working with the driveway markers, you’ll also want to go ahead and cut two more pieces of fiberglass that are approximately a third of the size of your desired weapon length. In the case of your hypothetical 3’8”, this means you’d be cutting yourself two additional pieces of pipe at the length of 15”.  These are going to be used for the handle of your weapon!

Step Two: Gluing the Handle

After you have your three pieces of fiberglass cut you’re going to super glue them all together. Your longest piece, the core of your weapon, should obviously be in the middle; and the two shorter pieces should be on either side of it.

Wait for the super glue to dry, then take your Gorilla Glue and work on filling in any gaps on the handle with it. This will give your handle some extra security and prevent the pipes you cut from moving around or separating during combat.
Weapon Tutorial 1

Step Three: Cutting the Foam

Next you’ll want to start cutting the blue camp foam. In total you’ll need five pieces as you create a type of foam box for your core to hide away in. The top and bottom pieces of foam, or the “bread” of your core sandwich, will be your widest pieces at 2 ½ inches. They should be long enough to cover the weapon from the top of the handle all the way up to the end of the core, plus another 2-4 inches past that depending on what type of weapon you decided to make. For the purposes of this tutorial, we’ll assume you’re making a sword. That means these pieces should be about 29 inches long. Essentially, they are going to look like long, skinny rectangles.

The next two pieces of foam you’re going to cut are going to be smaller because they are going on the sides of the core and filling in the gaps between the top piece of foam and the bottom one. They are roughly going to come out to be 25” x 1.5” when you are done measuring. We’re just saving you a little bit of time by doing that step for you.

The last piece of foam we’re going to have you cut is the smallest, but no less important. This is going to be the foam that creates a safe thrusting tip for you, so make sure you don’t skip this step. This piece should be about 4” x 2.5”, and will sit at the top end of the weapon. You can use scissors for this, but we prefer to use the knife because it gives us a squarer cutting edge.

Weapon Tutorial 2

Step Four: Gluing the Foam

For this next part, we usually use a piece of scrap foam and dip it into the Dap contact cement. Using the scrap foam as an applicator, you’ll want to carefully rub the Dap all over your bottom piece of foam like you’re buttering a piece of bread. Make sure you have a light, even coating over every inch of the foam. After you do this, go ahead and place the core down in the center of the foam.

Do the sides next. Lather up three sides of these pieces with Dap using the buttering technique. The foam facing the core should get a coating, as well as the sides. The foam facing away from the core does not need anything at this time. The idea is that all foam to foam connections are receiving the Dap.

The smallest piece, the thrusting tip, comes next. Once again, cover each part of this piece that will be touching another piece of foam in Dap. Push down into place above the end of the core. At this point you should also be making sure that all your foam is fitting snugly together so that there are no gaps or wiggle room for your core to move or shift.

Before you glue down the last piece of foam, you’ll want to make a thin line of Gorilla Glue and run it down the length of the core that is getting covered. The purpose of this is extra security again. When it dries it will expand and make sure the core is tightly fastened in place. Safety and security should always be your top priority when crafting weapons for use in a boff heavy LARP!!

Finally you’re ready to DAP up your last piece of foam and place it on top of the core, sandwiching it down onto the rest. As it dries, you’ll want to be squeezing it and making sure everything is pressed tight together. Again, there should be no gaps or void areas in your foam. For a hands free experience we typically put a heavy object down upon our weapons while they dry. This is one of the more lengthy steps because you’ll want to wait for the glue to dry before you continue past this point. To be safe, give your weapons a 12 hour resting period to allow the glue ample drying time.
Weapon Tutorial 3

Step Five: Shaving the Foam

With your weapon dry, you’re ready to begin the fun stuff! This is the part where your weapon starts to take shape. Using your knife, cut off the excess foam and trim it down into an actual sword shape.

A word of caution: take care not to make it too pointy, and be doubly sure not to cut too close to the pipe!

The goal with these weapons is to artistically shape the foam and carve the padding into the shape you want. This is how you get the more realistic sword shape, but still out of safe padded foam.

Step Six: The Sanding

Once you have the shape of your blade carved into the foam you’ll need to smooth out the edges. This is where the sandpaper comes into play. A lot of people like to tell us that this step isn’t necessary, but we disagree. You’ll want to LIGHTLY sand and smooth the edges of your weapon if you’re placing duct tape onto it. If you don’t, every single flaw in your foam carving will be seen or detected under the tape. The foam bumps may even cause bumps in your duct tape if you’re not careful.

Step Seven: Optional Crossguard

If you want to really go for the more realistic looking weapon, this would be the time to add the crossguard. Again, you’d be using the blue camp foam to do this. Carve out a design you like, and then Dap both sides and sandwich it around the core.

Unfortunately, if you do this, you’re going to need to wait the recommended 12 hours for this part to dry as well. Do not rush the process! If you do, you risk the pieces moving around on you and not properly setting.

Once it does dry, you’re going to repeat the light sanding steps that you just did for the rest of the weapon, smoothing out the edges of the crossguard you designed.

Weapon Tutorial 4

Step Eight: Reinforcing the Thrusting Tip

Before you start to cover up the foam, we’re going to take one more step to secure everything into place and make sure your weapon is safe. Take some strapping tape and encircle the blade with it in the area where the foam of your thrusting tip meets the rest of the foam.

We do this, because this is the weakest point on a thrusting weapon, and you want to make sure that it remains stable for your weapon to be safe. Every little bit helps.

 

Step Nine: Adding Your Duct Tape/Covering

On this step you get to make more aesthetic choices. Want to use wood grain duct tape on the shaft of your axe? Go for it. Metallic silver blade? Do it up. The possibilities are near endless; and you don’t have to just use duct tape either. There are tons of fabrics out there that could make for really interesting/thematic weapon socks.

If you are working with duct tape, take your time. If you rush your tape can bubble and make your beautiful sword shape look like it has a sloppy tape job. From personally experience, I like to run my thumb along the center of the tape and slowly side my pointer finger outwards towards the edges like I’m getting rid of the air bubbles underneath.

Step Ten: Wrapping the Handle

This is another aesthetic step, so you can use whatever materials you like. People have used a variety of things over the years from electrical tape, grip tape, to rawhide. We prefer the natural look of the rawhide, so that is what we usually go with. The choice is yours! If you are going to use rawhide, use some duct tape on your handle to make a sticky surface for it to adhere to; then wrap it tightly.

Weapon Tutorial 5

Step Eleven: Profit

That’s it! You’re ready to go and wield your weapon proudly! Just don’t forget that in Realms these are still experimental construction techniques as far as the rules are concerned. You’ll need to be responsible and check your weapons in with a marshall at the top of the event before you can use them in combat.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact Hygar or Kindrianna (Derek & Renee Booke) and we would be happy to run through the process with you.

Take care, and happy LARPing!

 

Legends of Voraniss: Mon’ghora the Sky Boar

Unlike the tales of Osag and Riel’iefyr, the story of Mon’ghora isn’t about the heroic deeds of some Man or Elf. Her story reminds us that there are ancient places upon this earth where humanoids still fight for power against the mighty primordial beasts that once controlled the world. You see, Mon’ghora was not in fact a person, but an enormous boar that towered over six feet high. In her prime she was a walking boulder; a huge creature with jagged tusks and an angry squeal that could split the heavens when she was in a foul mood.

Many hunters tried to slay her, but they always met with disaster. Her toughened hide turned away their spears like harmless children’s toys, and her charge could not be halted by any wall they could build. Her ferocity went unmatched, and she became a Queen of the forest like no other as warriors of every specie fell in line behind her as a sign of respect.

Unfortunately for Mon’ghora, her great power invited the envy of the Giants. It was they, with their great height and close proximity to the clouds, who should command the hearts of the masses they believed. In secret they plotted, keeping an eye on Mon’ghora and her followers so that they might strike when the time was right.

One day when Mon’ghora and her people were traveling close to the Calandia mountain pass, the Giants attacked. Some of them covered the exit to the pass with huge rocks along with their bodies; trying to prevent escape. The other Giants had climbed up the cliffs, looking down upon the trapped Animal-kin and various humanoids that usually traveled beside the Queen Boar, as they lifted logs and enormous stones like projectile weapons.

Protectively, Mon’ghora urged her followers to run back the way they had come and away from the trap the Giants had sprung…but she was not to go with them. Never one to back down from a fight, the she-Boar turned angrily to face the barricade that had been constructed before her and used her own body to plug up the pass and prevent the giants on the ground from pursuing those that fled.

Stomping her hooves into the dirt, the earth began to shake and tremble beneath her. Several Giants tumbled down from the cliffside and crashed into the rock below where they were buried beneath an angry landslide. Mon’ghora didn’t stop there. The mighty creature began to scream and squeal, causing her remaining opponents to cover their ears in desperation.

Sensing the weakness of her enemies, Mon’ghora charged forth as she mustered all the fierce and righteous rage that she could. Panicking at the sight, the first Giant in her path lowered his spear to skewer her; but the weapon snapped upon impact and she gored him through the legs on her way by. Blood littered the ground of the mountain pass and Giants dove out of her way as fast as they could; terrified that they too would be on the receiving end of her furious punishment.

Unable to see clearly through the haze of mayhem, the last Giant in her path saw her coming only when she was already on top of him. He didn’t have enough time to raise his weapon, so he did the only thing he could think of in the heat of the moment. The Giant grabbed Mon’ghora by the tusks and started to swing her. Round and round he spun until he was so dizzy that he could no longer see straight. Nauseous and drunk with terror he let out a fatalistic scream of his own as he finally released her.

Up into the air Mon’ghora went sailing, boring a hole through the clouds and sky. The friction of the fast moving wind upon her skin caused her to combust into flames, but still she didn’t stop charging. This was how the sun was born the locals tell me. Each day you can see Mon’ghora running around the world as she eternally chases the Giants that dared defy her, and each day she disappears for a short while as the world mourns her departure to the heavens and the sky turns dark with despair.

Some of the Orcs tell the story a little differently. They say that Mon’ghora only went berserk in the pass because she was trying to protect her family and infant child. They also suggest that they are descended from her, the peoples that were chosen to carry on her bloodline of strength and unwavering ferocity in the heat of battle. It might explain their cultural attitudes, and maybe even their tusks. Unfortunately, there aren’t any Orcs alive today, which we know of, that were around during the time this legend began.

Either way, the story is an interesting one and showed us just how much respect still exists within our lands for the once powerful Queen.

When magical creatures and their allies unite in defense of their freedom and the forest they love, there is no telling what kinds of shenanigans might ensue.